Thriving on Antipsychotics

Yes, it may be killing a fly with a blowtorch, but I am happy.

Aimée Sparrow

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I am one of those poor, unfortunate souls forced to be on antipsychotics for life. It turns out that being outwardly insane is frowned upon. It was tough — at first, I decided life was too bleak, and I must have already died, so I lived as if I were already dead and had no hopes for the future. Luck has it; I’ve found a way to thrive, and here is what I do.

I give myself time to rest when needed, and it is often. I am kind to myself so that I can, in turn, remain kind to others, have satisfying relationships, and feel and receive compassion and understanding. It’s easy to give up and feel intense despair from the pain of suffering and decide to become a horrible person in return, but that gets us into a terrible position.

I remain humble and remember that I always have much to learn. Growing up, being slightly more advanced in intelligence, I did not develop a stubborn, arrogant, or haughty attitude. Not thinking we are superior to others helps us continue to learn from them because every person can know more than we do about a particular subject as long as we are patient enough to ask.

I feel satisfied and grateful for all the beautiful things I have. With this feeling, we can attract more gifts from daily life, such as luck or synchronicities, as if we are being watched over by higher beings in higher dimensions. Because our vibration rises when we recognize our good fortune, feel happy and fulfilled, and retain our ability to feel unbridled joy, we are visible to those helpers who manipulate reality itself to help us succeed.

I do not dwell on how frequent my depressions are and instead fight through them and try to get better as quickly as possible. I speak my grievances as soon as possible, hear about how irrational they are, and then get the thoughts away from my consciousness and focus on something more enjoyable.

Learning to be healthy in silence, doing nothing, and just being increases calm, resilience, and happiness. It means nothing in our mind is trying to overtake us and make us listen, that we have heard and acknowledged all our emotions, good and bad. Finally, we can live with less stress and anxiety and let our bodies move freely and…

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Aimée Sparrow

An explorer of the philosophy behind psychology and what we dream to inspire peace and solace from suffering. aimee.sparrowling@gmail.com